How to Start Brushing Your Pet’s Teeth

 

Brushing your pet’s teeth should be something you do as frequently as you brush your own teeth. By brushing your pet’s teeth daily, you can reduce the amount of plaque and oral bacteria in their mouth and help keep pet dental disease at bay. Here are five steps to get started. 

 

Step 1: Purchase pet-friendly toothbrushing products

When brushing your pet’s teeth, don’t use your own toothpaste. Since your pet can’t spit, they could swallow the fluoride contained in regular toothpaste, which can be harmful. Instead, purchase flavored toothpaste designed for pets, along with a small child’s toothbrush or a finger brush that will fit in your pet’s mouth. 

 

Step 2: Offer your pet a small amount of toothpaste

Before jumping into brushing your pet’s teeth, offer them a taste of the toothpaste. Ideally, they’ll think it’s a treat and search for more.

 

Step 3: Use your finger to rub toothpaste on your pet’s teeth

Once your pet is excited about the toothpaste, use your finger to rub more paste on their teeth instead of allowing them to lap it up. Most pets will be more accepting of your finger in their mouth initially, and this will help ease the introduction of the toothbrush.

 

Step 4: Introduce the toothbrush to your pet

After your pet gets used to having your finger swipe along with their teeth and gums—and realize they get more delicious toothpaste with this action—squeeze a dollop onto the toothbrush and offer it to them. They may be wary of the toothbrush at first, but once they realize it holds a tasty treat, they’ll accept it.

 

Step 5: Gently brush your pet’s teeth with the toothbrush

Once your pet is licking the toothbrush, gently insert it into their mouth and scrub their teeth. Focus on the outer, cheek-side surface of the teeth since their tongue usually does a good job of removing plaque on the inner surface. When finished, praise your four-legged friend for a job well done!

 

Although brushing your pet’s teeth at home is a great way to slow plaque and tartar accumulation, your furry pal still will need regular oral exams and dental cleanings to keep the tooth structure below the gumline healthy. If your pet is suffering from pain in their mouths give our team a call to see how we can help!